Monday

Appartement Rome

Appartement Rome

Nous offrons des appartements pour vacances à louer à Rome dans les quartiers les plus beaux de la ville: Campo dei Fiori, Piazza Navona, Piazza di Spagna, Trastevere, Pantheon, Colosseo, Vaticano. Nous louons des appartements aussi hors du centre historique.
Nous louons à Rome des appartements pour vacances (appartements entièrement meublés utilisés seulement pour locations) et des appartements pour sous-locations (un appartement où le proprietaire normalement habite mais qui est périodiquement libre). Nos évaluations et le système des commentaires des clients assurent que chaque appartement soit toujours propre, bien meublé et contenant tous les objets de la qualité la plus haute. Les appartements les mieux classés sont simplement imbattables!
Nos appartements pour vacances à Rome peuvent etre loués pour un minimum de 3 nuits jusqu'à un maximum de 6 mois. En choisissant de louer nos appartements vous épargnez le 70% du total des prix des hotels, prix italiens.

Rome Airport Transfer

Best value transfer or taxi from Fiumicino or Ciampino airport into Rome.

Rome Airport Transfer

Tuesday

Rome Reborn

Digital project to bring ancient Rome back to life.

Rome Reborn

Monday

Piazza My-Own-A

Piazza My-own-a

Travelling to Rome, especially from the UK is so easy these days that anyone, on almost any budget, can spend a few days or a few weeks experiencing 2000 years of history and culture. Thanks to La Citta Eterna (The Eternal City) of Rome is one of the most beautiful cities in the world, full of diversity with something for everyone. My favourite part of Rome is Piazza Navona. In the day this square is packed tightly with some of the world’s most beautiful modern independent and armature art. Grab yourself a bargain with an oil paint original, (they could be the future Botticelli or Del Drago), squash your family onto a folding chair for a group caricature or simply slow down your pace and get lost in the art, wandering from stand to stand and flicking your way through the racks. Almost all of the artists/sellers speak even a small amount of English and many are willing to barter regarding prices, however if a price is set, (e.g.: caricatures are usually 10-20EUR and prices are generally on signs next to the artist' stand), these are generally non-negotiable.

At night, Piazza Navona becomes a Roman HOT SPOT for dining and Socialising. As the sky darks, the lights of the fountains shine and the restaurants and bars, lining the square, fill with the sound of violins, accordions and romantic Italian love songs. Piazza Navona is also the home of the Brazilian-Italian Embassy and occasionally you will here the sound of Brazilian World music escaping through the high windows into the hustle and bustle below. Piazza Navona IS busy at night; with a mixture of evening tourists passing through to visit the fountains on there way to the next tourist attraction, and the restaurants which are always full; but the busyness is part of the attraction.

There are also some fantastic restaurants very close by to Piazza Navona only one street away, containing some of the best food I have tasted in Rome and they are generally less busy and much less expensive than those located directly inside the Piazza. These restaurants are also often popular with the locals, (always a good sign that the food is quality). Most of the restaurants speak a basic English, but, (as with any country abroad), are always grateful, (and often more helpful), if you are polite and try to use even the most basic Italian words or phrases in your questions and answers. Below I have included some basic information about asking for things in Italian, regarding please and thank you.

Of course there are hundreds if not thousands more restaurants in the centre of Rome, including plenty of other foreign foods: Chinese, Japanese & Sushi Bars, Irish Pubs, Kebab Bars and Other World Foods. Do not be afraid to try smaller restaurants located in side streets and don't be afraid to take a walk around before choosing a restaurant. Eating out abroad can be VERY expensive and VERY cheap; you just have to be prepared to look around. Check out the menus outside the restaurants, (usually enlarged and pinned on a board), and compare the prices against others near by. Italian Food IS fantastic and the more authentic the restaurant the better. So find one you like, sit down with some house wine or a nice cold Peroni, enjoy a taste of Italy and bask in finding a PIAZZA OF YOUR-OWN-A.

Some Things I have picked Up on My Travels.

It is not entirely necessary to say please, “per favore”, in Italy. Instead Italian's more frequently use Thank you, “Grazie”. For example: When asking for something in English we would generally end the sentence with “May I...please?” In Italian, it is more common for people to simply state “I would like...” Then when the seller/waiter (tress)/assistant responds “OK” or “Si” to confirm that they have understood you, then you will say “Thank you”, repeating this again when you receive the item. In my experience, getting a “per favore” onto the end of your question, before the person has walked away is almost impossible; very rare. However, this is not because they are being ignorant, it is just not expected. Just make sure if you are not using Per Favore when asking things that you are polite and say Grazie at least combined with Ciao when you are leaving. I have included an example situation/conversation below, including VERY basic Italian.

E.g.: YOU: Salve (hello)
SHOP ASST: Salve. Prego (What do you want? OR how can I help you)
YOU: Vorrei un gelato con Stracciatella? (I would like an ice-cream with Stracciatella (a flavour)
SHOP ASST: Una coppa? (An ice-cream cup)
YOU: Si. Grazie. (Yes. Thank you)
SHOP ASST: OK. Due Euro. (Assistant hands you the cup of ice cream. “Two Euros”)
YOU: Grazie. (You give them the money and thank them)
SHOP ASST: Prego. Grazie. (You’re Welcome. Thank you.)
YOU: (As you leave...) Grazie, Ciao. (Thank you. Bye.)
SHOP: Grazie a Te. Ciao OR Buona Sera/ Giorno (Thank you to you. Bye OR Good Evening/Day.)

From this short example you will also have noticed that “Prego” can mean several things. When you first enter a shop it usually means “I'm ready to take your order. / How can I help? / What do you want?” As a response to “Grazie (Thank you)” it means “You're welcome”.